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Department of Food, Nutrition, Dietetics and Health

Student Learning Outcomes: B.S. in Human Nutrition

KNOWLEDGE

A.1 Students will demonstrate an understanding of and ability to apply the human ecological approach, or the knowledge of interaction of people with other individuals, groups (families, work surroundings, communities, and societies), and their environments (e.g., technology).
Knowledge:  Knowledge of the human ecological approach.

1. Knowledge of the underlying assumptions and concepts of the human ecological approach.
2. An understanding of roles and dynamics within human systems, including individuals, families, groups, and environments.

Personal attributes: Display personal attributes that reflect an understanding of the human ecological approach.

3. Display personal traits that demonstrate responsibility as a citizen and community member.  Such traits would include:

a. Being receptive to and valuing diverse sources of feedback.
b. Taking a participatory role in human environments.
c. Balancing individual needs with collective needs.

Skills: Ability to view human problems and solutions within the environment that they occur.

4. Can evaluate human problems and solutions within a larger developmental, ethical, cultural, and policy context.
5. Can apply the human ecological perspective to manage resources, solve problems, and improve the quality of life.
6. Use of appropriate technology within a given context to inform and support problem-solving and decision-making.

A.2 Students will demonstrate a depth of knowledge and apply the methods of inquiry in human nutrition.
Knowledge:  Ares of understanding in foods and human nutrition.

1. Comprehend the role of nutrition and foods,  and levels of nutrient function, in maintaining normal health and nutrition support in disease throughout the life span
2. Evaluate and comprehend standards, nutrition laws, regulations and policies for dietary planning and intervention
3. Analyze and understand aspects of nutrition behavior (eg. Socioeconomic status, culture, psychology, consumer choices, costs) and their application to health risks.

Personal Attributes:  Attributes that are needed in professional practice.

4. Appreciate the impact of culture on setting and achieving health and nutrition goals

Skills:  Develop the behaviors and performance tasks needed in the profession.

5. Display the ability to assess and interpret nutrition and health status using appropriate anthropometric, biochemical, clinical and dietary data
6. Demonstrate familiarity with health survey data, calculating diet prescriptions, use of medical terminology for medical records, document dietary planning and collect pertinent information from subjects and patients
7. Prepare food and plan nutrition and food programs and evaluate their effectiveness
8. Use of appropriate technology (laboratory equipment, selected computer software programs, assessment instruments, teaching equipment) within a given context to inform and support problem-solving and decision-making,

CRITICAL THINKING

B. “Critical thinking: Ability of students to analyze carefully and logically information and ideas from multiple perspectives” (Taken from Indiana University Purdue University at Indianapolis)
Knowledge:  An understanding of the underlying philosophy of critical thinking.

1. Know enough about nutrition and foods to identify current and potential issues and problems.
2. Understand how to identify assumptions underlying nutrition and foods issues/problems.
3. Understand that various solutions should be examined and each may have its own merit.

Personal attributes: Attributes that are needed to become a critical thinker.

4. Develop a desire to recognize and seek out opportunities for creative thinking.
5. Develop an appreciation of the value of multiple perspectives.
6. Be receptive to using knowledge and understanding in generating and exploring new opportunities and questions.

Skills:  Exhibit behaviors that are needed in critical thinking.

7. Integration of foundation concepts in problem solving and development of new application
8. An ability to examine and explore multiple perspectives and alternatives to interpreting nutrition and health information.
9. Synthesize and suggest modification to diminish risks and promote health throughout the life-span.
10. Recognize credible information sources in nutrition.

COMMUNICATION

C. An ability and willingness to convey information effectively and respond to feedback using appropriate communication methods. Such methods could include written, verbal, nonverbal, and visual communication, and that the usage of specific methods is dependent upon the audience and context.
Knowledge and Skills: An understanding of and ability to use effectively written, verbal, nonverbal, and visual communication.

1. An understanding of what forms of communication are appropriate for different audiences and in different contexts/cultures.
2. A basic understanding and ability to use written communication (e.g., grammar, sentence structure, spelling) to convey clearly ideas and thoughts.
3. An understanding of and ability to use basic and technical verbal communication that is needed to communicate one-on-one, in groups, and to make formal presentations.
4. An understanding of and ability to use visual communication to enhance, supplement, or replace written or verbal information.
5. An understanding of how to use technology to enhance and supplement communication.

Personal attributes: Attributes that are needed to be a successful communicator.

6. A willingness to communicate with and listen to others, in spite of obstacles that may be present.

DIVERSITY

D. Knowledge, personal attributes, and skills needed for living, working, and leading in diverse global societies : These student learning outcomes have been developed by the Intercultural Infusion Initiative.
Knowledge: Areas of awareness and understanding needed for living, working, and leading in diverse global societies.

1. Comprehend cultures and world-views different from their own.
2. Recognize how interpersonal relations and cultural groups have been and are shaped by dominant social structures, economies, political systems, and religions.
3. Describe the changing demographics (racial, ethnic, socioeconomic status, age, etc.) of the minority and majority populations in the United States
4. Analyze how their own socio-historical and cultural background biases and influence their development and interpersonal relationships
5. Analyze the impact of decisions and policies on global societies

Personal attributes: Personal traits needed for living, working, and leading in diverse global societies.

6. See the world from someone else’s perspective.
7. Respond with tolerance and respect others with diverse beliefs, feelings, and lifestyles.
8. Be receptive to having one’s own views examined.
9. Accept responsibility for being open-minded, flexible, and empathic with divergent perspectives.

Skills: Behaviors and performance task needed for living, working, and leading in diverse global communities

10. Participate in activities aimed at solving human problems.
11. Display ability to work cooperatively and in a team with diverse people.
12. Display ability to discuss and negotiate controversial issues.
13. Accepts responsibility to be empathic towards others and consider the impact of decisions on others.
14. Practices sensitivity, adaptability, and flexibility in intercultural settings.

OWNERSHIP FOR LEARNING

E. An understanding of, developing attributes and abilities toward, and skills needed to take ownership for learning.
Knowledge: An understanding of the importance of life-long learning and how to continue to be a learner.
  1. Recognize the importance of life-long learning and current developments.
  2. Know how to seek out and use appropriate resources to gain information (e.g., libraries, databases, Internet).
  3. Recognize opportunities for continuous learning from exposure to divergent perspectives.
Personal attributes: Attributes that are needed to be a life-long learner.
  1. Acquire an inclination to be a life-long learner and to become and remain well informed, especially in one’s own career development.
  2. Acquire self-awareness in order to understand where personal and professional growth is needed.
Skills: Develop the skills needed to be a life-long learner.
  1. Develop abilities to retrieve, evaluate, and manage information appropriately.

PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

F.An understanding of, developing attributes and abilities toward applying the professional and ethical behaviors that are required as professionals in their professional area or degree program
Knowledge: An understanding of professional and ethical behaviors.

1. Knowledge of those professional organizations and meetings that impact professional identity in nutrition and health.
2. Knowledge of significant publications (e.g., journals, references, periodicals) in nutrition, food, public health and other science publications.
3. Knowledge of professional ethical standards in nutrition and health-related practice settings.
4. Professional responsibilities, licenses, certifications and limitations for practice.. 

Personal attributes: Attributes that are needed for professional and ethical conduct.

5. Internalize a sense of accountability for classes, projects, and personal conduct.
6. Develop a sense of professional identity by internalizing high ethical standards and responsible behaviors.
7. Develop an appreciation of the results that come from addressing issues through a team approach.

Skills: An ability to apply professional and ethical behaviors required in their professional area or degree program.

8. Work effectively as a team member in both large and small groups, and when appropriate, demonstrate leadership skills.
9. Practice professional and emotional maturity in giving and receiving feedback and criticism.
10. Administration of human subjects research including confidentiality, basic screening, compliance, privacy regulations, etc.

Department of Nutrition Student Learning Outcomes for 2008-2011

The ad hoc committee on Student Learning Outcomes recommends that the 2008 to 2009 academic year have data collected to serve as the baseline year.  The next two subsequent years will allow a comparison to base line outcomes.

Knowledge SLO

Display the ability to assess and interpret nutrition and health status using appropriate anthropometric, biochemical, clinical and dietary data.

Courses Where TaughtAssessment MeasuresWho Will Be Assessed?
HN 450
HN 510
HN 535
HN 631
HN 632

Case Studies in HN 632

HN 450 Pediatric Anthropometric Lab Score

Food, Nutrition, Dietetics and Health & Dietetics majors
Critical Thinking and Ownership for Learning SLOs

Develop abilities to retrieve, evaluate, and manage credible nutrition information appropriately.

Courses Where TaughtAssessment MeasuresWho Will Be Assessed?
HN 132
HN 400
Hn 413
HN 510
Hn 535
HN 600
Hn 620
HN 631
HN 632

HN 400 assignment on Credible sources of nutrition information

HN 631 presentation on management of a disease scores

Food, Nutrition, Dietetics and Health & Dietetics majors
Communication SLOs

An understanding of and ability to use basic and technical verbal communication that is needed to communicate one-on-one, in groups, and to make formal presentations.

Courses Where TaughtAssessment MeasuresWho Will Be Assessed?
HN 510
Hn 535
HN 600
HN 631
HN 632

Medical terminology quizzes in HN 631 & HN 632

Formal Presentation of a public health nutrition problem from HN 600

HN 413 Lab Projects on presentations of "cheeses" and "cooking methods"

Food, Nutrition, Dietetics and Health & Dietetics majors
Personal and Professional Development SLOs

Work effectively as a team member in both large and small groups, and when appropriate, demonstrate leadership skills.

Courses Where TaughtAssessment MeasureWho Will Be Assessed?
HN 400
HN 413
HN 535
HN 600
HN 631
HN 632

HN 631 and HN 632 in-class presentations

HN 631 and HN 632 Team Scores

HN 413 Peer Evaluation of final meal on ability to work together

Food, Nutrition, Dietetics and Health & Dietetics majors